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Master of Science in Software Engineering


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The Program

The University of Scranton's Master of Science degree in Software Engineering (MSSE) is designed to prepare professionals in the field of software development. The program provides instructions and hands-on experience in planning and analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance of computer software and documentation. You will gain experience with computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools, object-oriented analysis and design, formal methods and models, software reuse techniques, and the role that elegant software engineering plays in the construction of integrated software solutions. Some of your work may be done in cooperation with local firms. The result is a comprehensive, practical foundation that prepares you for a successful career in the growing field of software development.

The University of Scranton is an active place when classes are in session. The department is located on the first floor of the Loyola Science Center (LSC). The departmental labs are also located in this area. When you visit, stop by the department office (LSC190). The secretary will find a faculty member to give you a tour of our facilities and answer your questions about the program. Appointments may be made by calling the department at (570) 941-7774. We can also be reached by fax at (570) 941-4250, or e-mail at cmps@cs.scranton.edu or se@cs.scranton.edu.

The Curriculum

The Master of Science in Software Engineering (MS SE) program requires 36 graduate credits, divided as follows:

Fundamentals - Four courses, 12 credits:

SE 500, 501, 504, and 507

Advanced courses - Six courses, 18 credits:

SE 510, 524, plus four elective courses

Thesis project - Two courses, 6 credits:

SE 598, 599


Capstone Experience

Each student is required to complete a thesis project which is normally done during his/her last year in the program. A faculty member works with the student as the project advisor and at least one other faculty member must read and approve the student's thesis report. A thesis project normally involves the design and implementation of a software system and it requires the use of tools, techniques, and theory learned from previous courses. The studentis required to defend his/her thesis publicly. Six credits are awarded for the thesis project via the two-semester course sequence SE 598 and SE 599.


Course Descriptions


SE 500 - Mathematics for Software Engineering

Prerequisites:Admission to the program
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

This course introduces students to the formal mathematical tools and methods necessary for software engineering. Topics include equational logic, propositional calculus and its applications, techniques of proof, formal logic, quantification and predicate calculus, application of predicate calculus to programming, and mathematical induction.

SE 501 - Introduction to Software Development

Prerequisites:Admission to the program
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

This course serves as an introduction to the discipline of Software Engineering, involving both a study of theory and practice. Significant ideas and developments are emphasized along with an examination of terminologies, classifications, paradigms, and methodologies. The course also provides an opportunity to review essential computer science material (data structures, programming languages and environments, systems, and architectures) as appropriate within this context.

SE 504 - Formal Methods and Models

Prerequisites:SE 500
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

This course is concerned with the application of mathematical techniques and models to the problem of software development. Of particular concern are means by which to develop provably correct programs.

SE 507 - Requirements Analysis and Software Specification

Prerequisites:SE 500
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

Exploration of two inter-related subjects of software life-cycle-process; requirements and their specifications. Topics: Requirements analysis techniques, interview process, prototypes, types of requirements (functional, nonfunctional, reliability, quality, security, etc.), traceability, languages of specification (axiomatic, algebraic, finite state machine, abstract, operational, concurrency).

SE 510 - Principles and Applications of Software Design

Prerequisites:SE 507
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

This course covers the principles, methods, and techniques used in the design of software systems. It includes architectural and detailed design with an emphasis on the object-oriented paradigm. Topics include software design process; design principles; software architectures; frameworks; design patterns; and coding idioms; design notations and support tools.

SE 515 - Software Generation and Maintenance

Prerequisites:SE 501
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

Maintenance accounts for about 70% of the software system life cycle. Designing new maintainable software systems is as important as dealing with existing non-maintainable ones. Topics include: writing reusable software components, automatic code and application generators and their limitations, regression analysis, reverse engineering, etc.

SE 516 - Engineering of Software Systems

Prerequisites:None
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

There is a parallel between hardware system engineering and software systems engineering. Several issues are relevant to both and in many cases they interact with each other. Topics include: system requirements gathering and specification, system design, interfaces with hardware and software systems, human-computer interfaces, system testing and integration, documentation, quality assurance, and configuration management.

SE 521 - Database Systems

Prerequisites:SE 507
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

A study of both theoretical and practical aspects of database systems with an emphasis on relational database systems. Topics include DBMS architectures, entity-relationship and UML data modeling, relational data modeling, database design using entity-relationship data models, relational algebra and Structured Query Language (SQL), functional dependencies and normal forms, system catalogs, transaction processing, concurrency control, and selected advanced topics.

SE 524 - Software Project Management

Prerequisites:SE 510
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

Software system development; project development; budget and human factors. Relationship between quality assurance, communication management and project documentation. Ethical and security issues.

SE 532 - Interactive and Time Critical Systems Design

Prerequisites:SE 507 and SE 510
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

Real-time and embedded software systems development present a whole different set of variables to the software engineer. This course focuses on a number of design, development, and maintenance techniques for this type of system. Topics include data acquisition and generation, system design strategies, testing constraints, verification, etc.

SE 598 - Project Analysis & Design

Prerequisites:Having passed all required courses
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

SE 598 and 599 is a two-semester sequence in which students are expected to undertake a software thesis project which requires the use of tools, techniques and theory learned from previous courses. It will be strongly recommended that thesis projects be developed in teams.

SE 599 - Project Implementation and Evaluation

Prerequisites:Having passed all required courses
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

SE 598 and 599 is a two-semester sequence in which students are expected to undertake a software thesis project which requires the use of tools, techniques and theory learned from previous courses. It will be strongly recommended that thesis projects be developed in teams.


Combined BS/BA and MS in SE Program

An undergraduate student of the University may be admitted to the combined program of their undergraduate degree and the Master of Science in Software Engineering (MS SE) graduate degree. Students majoring in Computer Science and Computer Information Systems in the combined may be able to complete their undergraduate degree and the master's degree in a total of five years. Students in other majors should consult with their undergraduate program about the length of their studies in the program.

Interested students should contact the director of the Master of Science in Software Engineering graduate program and the department of their undergraduate major to determine what Software Engineering graduate courses may be used to satisfy their undergraduate degree requirements.


Admission Requirements for All Applicants

To be admitted, the applicant must completed CMPS 134, 144, 240, 250, and Math 142 (or demonstrated a math background at or beyond Math 142) with

  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in those courses, and
  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all completed undergraduate courses.

A student in the combined program must complete undergraduate CMPS 340 and CMPS 352, and he/she must maintain

  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all of the CMPS courses,
  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all undergraduate courses, and
  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all Software Engineering graduate courses.

Failure to maintain the required GPAs may result in dismissal from the combined program.

Application for Admission

A student who is interested in the Combined Program should first contact the program director of the Software Engineering program and his/her undergraduate academic advisor. Application for the Combined program entails:

  1. Completing the Application for Graduate Admission.
  2. Completing the Combined Baccalaureate and Master's Degree Program form, which can be obtained from the College of Graduate and Continuing Education.
  3. Providing three letters of recommendation. The letters should be written by instructors who are familiar with the student's achievements and intended academic goals.
  4. Providing official transcripts ("student" copies are not acceptable) of all previous undergraduate and graduate work completed at accredited institutions.

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Combined BS/BA in CS/CIS and MS in SE Program

An undergraduate student majoring in Computer Science (CS) or Computer Information Systems (CIS) may be admitted to the combined program of their CS or CIS and the Master of Science in Software Engineering (MSSE) graduate degree. Such a student may be able to complete his/her undergraduate degree and the master's degree in a total of five years

Interested students should contact the director of the Master of Science in Software Engineering graduate program.

Admission Requirements

To be admitted, the applicant must completed CMPS 134, 144, 240, 250, and Math 142 (or demonstrated a math background at or beyond Math 142) with

  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in those courses, and
  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all completed undergraduate courses.

A student in the combined program must complete undergraduate CMPS 340 and CMPS 352, and he/she must maintain

  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all of the CMPS courses,
  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all undergraduate courses, and
  • a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all Software Engineering graduate courses.

Failure to maintain the required GPAs may result in dismissal from the combined program.

Application for Admission

A student who is interested in the Combined Program should first contact the program director of the Software Engineering program and his/her undergraduate academic adviser. Application for the Combined program entails:

  1. Contact the Graduate Program director and your undergraduate adviser.
  2. Complete the Accelerated/Combined Master’s Degree Program Curriculum Approval Worksheet at http://www.scranton.edu/academics/registrar/undergraduate/dual-degree-students.shtml
  3. Complete the Application for Graduate Admission at https://gradapply.scranton.edu/apply/
  4. Provide three letters of recommendation. The letters should be written by instructors who are familiar with the student's achievements and intended academic goals.
  5. Provide official transcripts ("student" copies are not acceptable) of all previous undergraduate and graduate work completed at accredited institutions.

Graduate Courses For B.S. in CS/CIS Requirements

Normally a baccalaureate degree takes four years to complete and a master's degree takes an additional two years. A student can finish the Combined program in only five years because it allows up to 12 credits of graduate work to be applied to both degrees. For Computer Science majors,

and for Computer Information Systems majors,

Students in the Combined Program are eligible for graduate assistantships.

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Visit the University's Graduate Admissions page for information on how to apply.


Prerequisite Courses

If you are admitted to the Master of Science in Software Engineering Graduate program without a formal background in computer science, you may be asked to take some prerequisites in addition to graduate courses. On the admission letter you receive from Dean of the graduate school you can find the prerequisites prescribed for you in the form of subject followed by a number. Here is a copy of the catalog description of those courses.


MATH 142 - (Q) Discrete Structures

Prerequisites:MATH 005 or MATH 102 or MATH 103 or MATH 106 or Math Placement DAT score of 13 or higher
Corequisites:None
Credits:4cr

A study of symbolic logic, sets, combinatorics, mathematical induction, recursion, graph theory, and trees. Intended for Engineering, Computer Science, and Computer Information Systems majors, but open to other qualified students.

CMPS 134 - Computer Science I

Prerequisites:None
Corequisites:CMPS 134L
Credits:3cr

An introduction to programming concepts and methodology using an object-oriented programming language (currently Java). Topics include problem analysis, abstraction, modularization, the development and use of algorithms, reuse, and the use of programming constructs including data types, classes, control structures, and methods.

CMPS 134L - Computer Science I Lab

Prerequisites:CMPS 134 (with departmental permission)
Corequisites:CMPS 134
Credits:1cr

Programming-related activities are undertaken that apply essential concepts from CMPS 134, including problem decomposition, modularization, flow of control, scoping, object-orientation, and algorithm development.

CMPS 144 - Computer Science II

Prerequisites:CMPS 134, CMPS 134L, and either MATH 114 or MATH 142
Corequisites:CMPS 144L
Credits:3cr

This course emphasizes object-oriented software development, addressing both software engineering and programming. Topics include modularization, abstraction, encapsulation/information hiding, software reuse, software testing, classic data abstractions (e.g., lists, trees) and algorithms (e.g., sorting, searching), recursion, program correctness, and basic algorithm analysis.

CMPS 144L - Computer Science II Lab

Prerequisites:CMPS 134 and CMPS 134L
Corequisites:CMPS 144 is required as a co-requisite, or as a prerequisite with departmental permission.
Credits:1cr

Activities are undertaken that apply programming concepts form CMPS 144, including object-orientation, inheritance, polymorphism, iterators, generics, algorithms involving various container structures (e.g., stacks, queues, lists, trees, graphs), analysis of algorithms, and concurrency.

CMPS 240 - Data Structures and Algorithms

Prerequisites:CMPS 144
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

An examination of the issues of data representation, algorithm structure, and encapsulation as they pertain to the development of object-oriented software. Abstract data types studied include stacks, queues, binary trees, n-ary trees, and graphs. Various representation alternatives are analyzed and compared, trade-offs frequently encountered by software developers are discussed.

CMPS 340 - Introduction to Database

Prerequisites:CMPS 144 required, CMPS 240 recommended
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

File structures concepts and file processing applications. Topics include file maintenance and storage management; file searching, sorting, and merging; consequential processing; index structures; B-trees; hash tables; indexed sequential files; database concepts.

CMPS 352 - Operating Systems

Prerequisites:CMPS 240, CMPS 250
Corequisites:None
Credits:3cr

An introduction to the principles of operating systems. Topics include operating system structure, process management, scheduling and dispatching, process synchronization and interprocess communication, memory management, virtual memory, device management, I/O, and file systems.


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GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK

  1. The Program
  2. The Curriculum
  3. Registration for Courses
  4. Computing Facilities
  5. Academic Code of Honesty
  6. Faculty
  7. Important Dates
  8. Important Phone Numbers

The Program

The Master of Science in Software Engineering program offered by the Department of Computing Sciences provides the rigorous foundations needed by practitioners in the field to produce reliable, modifiable and understandable software. The program emphasizes the application of the state of the art in software analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance, and the critical interactions between the phases. Students gain experience with CASE tools, formal methods, object-oriented analysis and design, software reuse techniques, software maintenance, and project management. The required capstone courses, the Thesis Projects, provide an opportunity to put together all of the student's knowledge into a major individual project. Some projects are performed in conjunction with local firms.

The program was first started in 1990 and the first group of students graduated in 1993. The student body is comprised of full-time students who come from the tri-state area, part-time students who work for local companies, and international students from different countries. Students in the program learn in small classes taught by full-time faculty and enjoy a close contact with their instructors. We currently have eight full-time faculty, five with doctorates. The University is well known for the quality of its teaching. Quality teaching requires staying abreast of current developments in the field and our faculty has a strong commitment to scholarship and is involved in development and research in the field.

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The Curriculum

The program requires 36 graduate credits distributed in three areas. The first area is Fundamentals and comprises four courses totaling 12 credits. The courses are:

  • Mathematics for Software Engineering
  • Introduction to Software Development
  • Formal Methods and Models
  • Requirements Analysis and Software Specification

The second area consists of two required and four elective advanced courses totaling 18 credits. It is expected that, with the consultation of the faculty advisor, the student will choose a combination of electives that best fit his/her goals. The required courses are:

  • Principles & Applications of Software Design
  • Software Project Management

and the elective courses include

  • Software Generation and Maintenance
  • Engineering of Software Systems
  • Database Systems
  • Cost Collection & Analysis Metrics
  • Interactive and Time Critical Systems Design
  • CASE Tools

The last area is a thesis project (six credits). The student will register for two courses for the thesis project in the last year of the program. The thesis project involves the design and implementation of a project under the supervision of a faculty member. The project can be related to the student's job in which case the faculty member will work with the student's supervisor at work. For detailed information on thesis projects, please refer to the Guidelines for MSSE Thesis Projects.

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Registration for Courses

Prior to each semester, a two-week advance registration will be held. All continuing students are expected to register during this period of time. Students are required to contact the Program Director about their schedule and obtain their registration PIN for online registration.

To drop or withdraw from a course, students must complete a Schedule Change form (which is available in the Graduate Office) and submit it to the Graduate Office. No Program Director's approval is needed for dropping and/or withdrawing from a course. See the academic calendar for deadlines and refund policies.

To add a course, students must complete a Schedule Change form and must obtain approval from the Program Director. The completed form with Program Director's approval must be submitted to the Graduate Office by the "add deadline" which may vary from year to year.

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Computing Facilities

Normally a SE student has access to two different computer systems, the university’s computer system and the computer system in the Computer Sciences Department. A student also has two separate email addresses for the two systems. The user ID for the university system generally consists of the last name followed by the first name initial and a number. For example, for John D. Smith, the user ID and the email address may look like:

smithj2@scranton.edu

The use ID for the Department system is the same as your university's ID. The department email address may look like:

jsmith2@cs.scranton.edu

Your instructors, the department, and the university may contact you by email through any of the two email systems. It is your responsibility to maintain your two accounts and read messages.

For the university email account you may contact the University Help Desk in AMH building in person, or call 941-HELP for details.

Your university account is normally set up when you apply for your Royal Card. Your department account is generally set up when you first time take class. Talk to your instructor(s) for your department account.

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Academic Code of Honesty

Review the Academic Code of Honesty available on the University of Scranton website.

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Faculty Information

Feel free to express your concerns to and ask questions of all members of the Department of Computing Sciences faculty. You may contact any of the faculty members in person, by phone, via email, and by postal mail. During regular semesters, every faculty member has his/her schedule posted on the office door. If you cannot meet the professor during his/her scheduled office hours, you may make an appointment via email or through the department secretary in LSC 235 (phone 570-941-7774). The following lists information about the faculty members and the graduate courses they normally teach.

NOTE: In Email addresses, the user ID of Dr. McCloskey is one letter shorter than his last name.

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Important Dates

Thesis Projects -- Written Reports:
1: Draft ProposalLast Monday of April
2: Advisor-Approved ProposalSecond Monday of May
3: Requirements Spec.First Monday of October
4: Design DescriptionFirst Monday of December
5: Testing DesignLast Monday of February
6: User's ManualLast Monday of March
7: Source CodeLast Friday of March
8: Thesis - Draft to AdvisorFirst Monday of April
9: Thesis - Final Copy to Graduate SchoolLast Friday of April *
Thesis Projects -- Oral Reports/Presentations:
1: First ReportLast Two Weeks of Fall Semester
2: Second ReportFirst Two Full Weeks of April
Application for Degree
Completed Application FormThird Monday of November

* The deadline for theses varies from year to year and it is normally around the last Friday of April. You must adhere to the Graduate School deadline in order to graduate in time.

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Important Phone Numbers

MSSE Program Director(570) 941-6108
Department of Computing Sciences(570) 941-7774
CS Dept -- FAX(570) 941-4250
Graduate School(570) 941-7600
International Student Affairs(570) 941-7575
Career Services(570) 941-7457
Computer Center Help Desk(570) 941-HELP

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PREDICTED COURSE SCHEDULE

The following table lists the course schedule for the next four years. Please note that some of courses are cycled, i.e., SE 516, SE 510, SE 524, and SE 532 are offered every other year. When planning your study schedule, please make sure to take this course cycling into consideration so you do not miss any course you must take before your planned graduation date.


The table also shows recommended study schedules for typical full-time students (who expect to graduate in two years) and typical part-time students (who expect to graduate in three years).

Select Student Status:

Full-Time (Graduate in 2 years)
Part-Time (Graduate in 3 years)

The course offerings in the table are subject to change, although no major changes are anticipated.


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FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS

FACULTY NAMERESEARCH INTERESTS
Yaodong BiDatabase Systems, Real-Time Systems, Operating Systems, Software Engineering, Software Architecture, Design Patterns, Mobile Apps
Benjamin BishopComputer Graphics, Simulation, Human-Computer Interaction, Computer Architecture, Specialized Systems, Mobile Devices
Paul JackowitzLanguages, Software Structures and Systems, Machine Organization, Computational Thinking, Computing Education
Robert McCloskeyAutomata and Formal Languages, Program Correctness, Algorithm Design, Information Retrieval
Richard PlishkaNetworks, Security, Digital Forensics, Privacy
Alex RudniyArtificial Intelligence, Data Mining, Deep Learning

THESIS GUIDELINES


General Information

Each student in the Software Engineering program is required to complete a thesis project as part of the requirements of the degree. While working on the two-semester project, the student registers for SE 598 in the Fall semester and for SE 599 in the Spring semester. This is normally done in the academic year in which the student plans to graduate. If students decide to have a team project, it is necessary to clearly and explicitly specify the responsibility of each team member as early as possible. Thus, if a member is behind schedule for some reason, the other member(s) will not be affected for graduation.

Students are responsible for choosing topics for their thesis projects and for writing proposals. There are three ways to find a project. First, go to the library and search for potential project topics from relevant journals and conference proceedings. Second, talk to faculty about their interests and find a faculty member who has the closest interests to yours and negotiate a project. Third, find a project that might be related to your work. This applies mostly to part-time students who work for a company with a software need. A student choosing this option must negotiate with the company to assure that the project meets company security concerns and still provides sufficient information for a published thesis. Students are not limited to the above mentioned three ways for finding a project.

Each project must consist of sufficient work and difficulty to warrant 6 credits. In a typical project, the student develops a new system and the documents for the software development cycle. Each project must have a faculty member as the project advisor. The project advisor will recommend a grade for the student in each semester to the Graduate Program Committee of the Department of Computing Sciences.


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Thesis Requirements

There are eight (8) written reports and two (2) oral presentations of 60 minutes each that are required for the M.S.S.E. thesis project.


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Written Reports

The eight (8) written reports and their due dates are listed here with the requirements listed below. Dates marked with an asterisk are of the academic year prior to the year in which the student registers for SE 598 and SE 599.

1: Draft ProposalLast Monday of April*
2: Advisor-Approved ProposalSecond Monday of May*
3: Requirements SpecFirst Monday of October
4: Design DescriptionFirst Monday of December
5: Testing DesignLast Monday of February
6: User's ManualLast Monday of March
7: Source CodeLast Friday of March
8: Thesis - Draft to AdvisorFirst Monday of April
9: Thesis - Final Copy to CGCE and LibraryLast Friday of April*
* The deadline for theses varies from year to year and it is normally around last Friday of April. You must adhere to the Graduate School deadline in order to graduate in time.

One copy of report 1 should be submitted to the project advisor and three copies of report 2 to the Graduate Program Committee of the Department of Computing Sciences. A copy of reports 3 through 7 should be submitted to the project advisor by the specified dates. Since those reports may be subjected to revisions as the project progresses, a copy of the final version of these reports must be submitted to the Department of Computing Sciences for documentation by the first Monday of April. Two copies of report 8 should be submitted to the project advisor, and one of them is forwarded to the second reader (who should be another faculty member) by the first Monday of April. After a satisfactory revision is made based on the feedback from the project advisor and the second reader, three copies of the thesis should be submitted to the Graduate School by the date specified by the Graduate School (around mid-April).

The above eight reports are recommended for typical M.S.S.E. thesis projects. Depending on the nature of each individual project, the name and contents of the reports may vary. The student(s) should consult with the project advisor for report formats appropriate for the project.


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Oral Reports

The first oral report should be scheduled during the last week or final exam week of the Fall semester and the second oral report should be scheduled during the first two full weeks of April.

1: First ReportLast Two Weeks of Fall Semester
2: Second ReportFirst Two Full Weeks of April

The presentation should be scheduled by the student in consultation with the project advisor at least one week in advance. The department secretary is to be informed of the time so room and equipment can be arranged and an announcement made. It is necessary to avoid any conflict with major university or department activities.

Each presentation should be about 50-60 minutes including at least 10 minutes for questions. The presentation should provide a conclusion to and analysis of the semester work. Visual aids are encouraged, and it may be necessary to make special arrangements to demonstrate the project. If the presentation requires any special equipment or arrangement, the student(s) must inform the faculty advisor of this at least a week before the presentation. It is the student’s responsibility to check the equipment properly before the presentation.


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Written Report Format

Reports must follow a consistent style, be electronically processed, be printed 1.5 or double spaced, and be laser printed. Each will have a cover page with the format:

PROJECT NAME
REPORT NAME

Author's Name

Modification Date

Submitted in partial fullfillment
of the requirements of the
Master of Science in Software Engineering

For all reports after the first two, the following format is recommended:

  • Cover Sheet
  • Abstract
  • Table of Contents
  • The main body of the report will have a chapter division with each chapter divided into sections and sub-sections
  • Index


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Report #1 & 2: Draft and Final Proposal

The draft proposal is used as a basis for the discussion with the project advisor. It should clearly state the goals and objectives of the project and hardware and software required for the project. A feasibility study will check the goals and objectives.

The final proposal must be approved by the project advisor and three copies shall be submitted to the Graduate Program Committee by the second Monday of May for departmental approval.


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Report #3: Requirements Specification

This report should clearly specify the functional and non-functional requirements of the system.


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Report #4: System Design Description

This report should clearly describe the architectural and detailed design of the system. A requirements traceability matrix should be provided to prove that the requirements specified in the Requirements Specification report are all satisfied.


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Report #5: Testing Design

In this report, the student should describe the test plan for the system that verifies the requirements specified in the Requirements Specification. The designed input and expected output should be specified.


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Report #6: User Manual

This report will be used for the end users of the system.


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Report #7: Source Code

Each project is required to have a complete copy of the source code of the system. It shall be commented professionally. Students are encouraged to follow a guideline for commenting the source code.


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Report #8: Thesis

This is the thesis to be submitted to the Library and the College of Graduate and Continuing Education (CGCE). The thesis should be prepared in two steps. First, the student submits a draft to the project advisor and a copy should be given to a second reader who is another faculty member in the department. In some unusual cases, the student may be asked to submit a copy for a third reader. Then, the student revises the draft based on the feedback from the project advisor and the second (and third) reader(s).

The thesis must be submitted to the Library by the deadline specified by the CGCE. The submission instructions can be found at Thesis Submission at Library's website.

This report should be derived from all the other reports and summarize the whole project. It should not be a collection of the other reports. Instead, it should emphasize the merit and significance of the project.

The thesis must conform to Graduate School Standards and should include the following:

  • Title Page
  • Abstract (single page)
  • Table of Contents
  • Multi-section Organization with a Consistent Format
  • Reference Section
  • Index

Use a proportional font (Times Roman or equivalent, 12 point), except for a fixed font (Courier 10, or equivalent) for code.


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References

  1. [ANSI IEEE 1999] IEEE, IEEE Standards Software Engineering, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., 1999.


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MS of Software Engineering



The University of Scranton's Master of Science degree in Software Engineering (MSSE) is designed to prepare professionals in the field of software development. The program provides instructions and hands-on experience in planning and analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance of computer software and documentation. You will gain experience with computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools, object-oriented analysis and design, formal methods and models, software reuse techniques, and the role that elegant software engineering plays in the construction of integrated software solutions. Some of your work may be done in cooperation with local firms. The result is a comprehensive, practical foundation that prepares you for a successful career in the growing field of software development.



The University of Scranton is an active place when classes are in session. The department is located on the first floor of the Loyola Science Center (LSC). The departmental labs are also located in this area. When you visit, stop by the department office (LSC190). The secretary will find a faculty member to give you a tour of our facilities and answer your questions about the program. Appointments may be made by calling the department at (570) 941-7774. We can also be reached by fax at (570) 941-4250, or e-mail at cmps@cs.scranton.edu or se@cs.scranton.edu.



The Master of Science in Software Engineering (MS SE) program requires 36 graduate credits, divided as follows:

Fundamentals - Four courses, 12 credits

Advanced courses - Six courses, 18 credits

Thesis project - Two courses, 6 credits



An undergraduate student of the University may be admitted to the combined program of their undergraduate degree and the Master of Science in Software Engineering (MS SE) graduate degree. Students majoring in Computer Science and Computer Information Systems in the combined may be able to complete their undergraduate degree and the master's degree in a total of five years. Students in other majors should consult with their undergraduate program about the length of their studies in the program.

Interested students should contact the director of the Master of Science in Software Engineering graduate program and the department of their undergraduate major to determine what Software Engineering graduate courses may be used to satisfy their undergraduate degree requirements.